Perks of running:

  • I am developing thighs (and buns) of steel

Down side of running:

  • Apparently I am not too young to get plantar fasciitis.
knvb Asked
QuestionWhat's your differential: 2 day history of sudden onset severe headache associated with photophobia, nausea, vomiting once the day before, neck stiffness and bilateral positive babinski signs. The patient is afebrile and has all normal vital signs and no focal neurological deficits other than the babinski previously mentioned. No papilledema either. I'm think subarachnoid hemorrhage but the 2 day history is throwing me off Answer

aspiringdoctors:

Meningitis maybe?

Couldn’t bilateral babinski signs point to early cerebellar mass effect too? 
So could it be like an aneurysmal SAH? I’m no med student, but could the neck stiffness be from meningeal irritation from the blood? Regardless, you can do a CT first to rule out SAH and if that’s inconclusive also do a LP to look for meningitis and xanthochromia as well? 

We fling open the doors of America’s emergency departments to help those who can’t afford health care.  We have legislated this protection: No person can be turned away for financial reasons.  This is very compassionate, and represents the higher angels of our culture.  Alas, it also is emblematic of the stupider demons of government.  You see, the ER demonstrates the inverted priorities of American society.

As I continued to read this article, I grew more and more upset and felt like I should respond to this.

Like most aspects of our health care system, Emergency Departments across the United States are in difficult situations. ERs see more patients every year, with estimates of more than 130 million visits last year. Our current system of health care is far from perfect, and there are going to be continued problems down the road if emergency departments across the country hit their breaking point; too many patients to see with too few staff members and limited resources. I don’t think there is anyone who would deny this is a major problem, even proponents of the ACA such as myself. 

This article is not completely off-base. Emergency Departments have arguably become abused by many. Every ED has its fair share of drug seekers and individuals who from first glance appear to abuse aid that is given to them by the government. But, just like ever ED has its fair share of drug seekers, every ED has its fair share of patients who seek out emergency departments due to dire emergencies and genuine lack of access to healthcare. 

What readers of this article (especially those who are not healthcare providers) may fail to realize is that the descriptions the author provides of his patients are gross generalizations and stereotypes that do nothing more than produce prejudice against those who seek care in ERs. Much like generalizations about race, sexuality, and religion, making assumptions about entire groups of people based off the characteristics of an individual or small group of people is poisonous to any attempt at intelligent dialogue.

Have I seen similar patients that the author describes in the article? Of course! Not a day spent in the ER went by without it. On the other hand, I never spend a single day in the ER where I do not see patients who are in genuine need of our help, and these patients often outnumber those who arguably should not be in the emergency department. 

Like I said, this article isn’t completely wrong. There are issues of entitlement when it comes to providing care in the ER. Just because the ER is open 24/7 does not mean it is there for the sake of convenience, and there are certainly people who go to the ER for the convenience factor. There are individuals who feel like they are entitled to every test they want performed, regardless of their intent to pay their bills later on or if we believe the test(s) is even medically relevant. But, these people do not define or even make up a majority of the patients who seek out care.

I’m not so sure the author of this article has ever been in similar situations as the “poor” people who come to his ER, those poor people who he says he loves. While the author most likely has no issue obtaining access to healthcare outside of the ER, this is not the case for everyone. Many individuals on medicaid and medicare come to ERs simply because they cannot find access to primary care, which is a huge issue right now in the United States. However, just because these people come to the ER does not make them the cause of our healthcare problems, but rather it is the symptom of the underlying disease. A disease which cannot and will not be fixed by assigning blame or prejudice to patients in emergency rooms across the country. 

Our healthcare system is in dire straits, I don’t think anyone could deny that. This article, however, does nothing more than to fuel arguments that create prejudice and stereotypes towards the lower income individuals who are constantly blamed for the “inverted priorities of American society”. This article, written by a physician who is twenty-one years out of his residency, contains exactly the language one might expect from an individual who has become jaded and disheartened. If we want to create dialogue that will precipitate change and foster solutions, then the dialogue needs to start with those of us who are not jaded, disheartened, and pessimistic. The dialogue needs to encourage change and not assign blame. Most of all, this dialogue should come from those of us who are just entering the system, those of us who are going to inherit the problem, and those of us who are going to be around to fix it. And that is exactly what I intend to do.

QuestionDo you know any other medical blogs I can follow because I want to go into the medical field and I was wondering Answer

diarymdstudent:

ermedicine:

cranquis:

diarymdstudent:

Hello! 

There are quite a few awesome blogs out there about medicine! Here are some of my favorites!

—> Medical Gal  

—> Aspiring Doctors 

—> ER Medicine 

—> Clumsy Medic

—> Beyond the Oath 

—> My Med Life 

—> Wayfaring MD  (who also has an amazing list with a ton of Medblrs)

And of course the grandfather of Medblr’s…. Dr. Cranquis

image

Well, hello there! That really means a lot that you mentioned me!!!!

I’d also like to a few more of my favorites to this list:

md-admissions

randommomentsdevida

medicalstate

modernathena90

descantforhope

ladykaymd

morebaffledlessbrooklyn

lol Now you’re seriously making me feel bad for forgetting people! There are so many of you guys and you’re all awesome! 

Don’t feel bad! I just wanted to give a shout out to the blogs that I love to read too! There are so many of us, all with amazing tumblrs!!

QuestionDo you know any other medical blogs I can follow because I want to go into the medical field and I was wondering Answer

cranquis:

diarymdstudent:

Hello! 

There are quite a few awesome blogs out there about medicine! Here are some of my favorites!

—> Medical Gal  

—> Aspiring Doctors 

—> ER Medicine 

—> Clumsy Medic

—> Beyond the Oath 

—> My Med Life 

—> Wayfaring MD  (who also has an amazing list with a ton of Medblrs)

And of course the grandfather of Medblr’s…. Dr. Cranquis

image

Well, hello there! That really means a lot that you mentioned me!!!!

I’d also like to a few more of my favorites to this list:

md-admissions

randommomentsdevida

medicalstate

modernathena90

descantforhope

ladykaymd

morebaffledlessbrooklyn

I’m pretty sure I just use my anxiety to fuel the fire underneath my ass so I continue to study nonstop because if I don’t get into med school I have no clue what I’m going to do with myself

  • Studied
  • Studied
  • Studied
  • Studied
  • Studied 
  • Studied
  • Cried in a corner in the fetal position
  • Studied
  • Studied
  • Cried Some more
  • Netflix

intrainingdoc:

A very informative infographic from Forbes showing the number deaths across Africa from Ebola’s many epidemics since 1976.

As Ebola continues to gain media attention in the U.S., this is a poignant reminder that Ebola remains a major public crises among many West African countries.

If you are interested in donating to organizations who continue to combat the Ebola epidemic, here is a list of NGOs that are involved in helping those affected in West Africa.

wayfaringmd:

Attending: Which one is Mr. B again?

Wayfaring: The one who’s using the dead neighbor’s oxygen. 

Attending: You know, I picture 2 shotgun houses about 10 feet apart with a really long tube running out the window from one to another so he can steal the O2. 

Wayfaring: I pictured more of a Misery type situation. You know, neighbor imprisoned in a small room in the house so they can collect the neighbor’s O2 and social security checks.

Or maybe the neighbor was already a few days dead and was on the floor starting to decompose and they went and pried the nasal cannula off his face and then stole it….

Attending: Wow Wayfaring, you have an unexpectedly dark mind. 

Wayfaring: image

intrainingdoc:

Today’s #tbt in-Training article focuses on being in a relationship with someone who is not a medical student, and how to be present in the life of our significant others.

What do you guys think? Is there any advice you could give on how to maintain a relationship while making your way through medical school?

Great article! I think this also applies to those of us in graduate school, or other professional schools (like PA and nursing) who have to deal with the pressures of performing well in the classroom and trying to maintain relationships at home.

Check it out, everybody!